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Entries tagged “LLC”

Limited Liability Company Considerations for Conducting Business: A Top Five List

Insight John J. Hanley John J. Hanley · Chae Kim Chae Kim · June 04, 2019
Formation of a limited liability company (“LLC”) is a popular and viable alternative to a corporation or a partnership. An LLC features both the limited liability of a corporation and the tax advantages of a partnership. In addition, the LLC model offers great flexibility in choosing the appropriate rules to govern unique

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How to Maintain Corporations and LLCs

Insight Michael Moradzadeh Michael Moradzadeh · March 19, 2010

Forming an LLC or a corporation is an important first step to achieving tax benefits and protection from liability.  In order to preserve these important benefits, however,  it is very important that your company is maintained properly. Otherwise, you run the risk that the separate nature of your company will be ignored by the IRS or a court of law.   While there is no substitution for the sound advice of experienced counsel, a few simple steps will help ensure that you reap the benefits of your LLC or corporation for as long as they exist. The minimum requirements for maintaining corporations and LLCs is that they must:  1) maintain adequate capitalization; 2) keep clean financial and legal records; and 3) be treated as separate and distinct from its owners.

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An LLC Can be Treated as an S-Corporation for Tax Purposes

Insight Michael Moradzadeh Michael Moradzadeh · February 02, 2010

An LLC can be treated as an S-Corporation for tax purposes if it makes an S-Corporation election as long as the entity meets the IRS criteria to be taxed as an S-Corp, files an S-Corp election and gets approved by the IRS to be taxed as an S-Corporation. Without an S-Corporation election, single member LLCs default to be taxed as sole proprietors and a multi-member LLCs defaults to be taxes as partnership since they are considered “disregarded entities”. However, if a single or multiple member LLC agreement meets the IRS criteria to be classified as a small business corporation, the S-corporation election is filed and gets approved by the IRS, then for tax purposes, not legal purposes the entity is an S Corp not a LLC.

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What is pass-through/flow-through taxation?

Insight Michael Moradzadeh Michael Moradzadeh · July 18, 2009

In a pass-through (or flow-through) entity, the entity’s income and expenses “pass through” the entity and are treated as the income and expenses of its owners. LLCs and S-Corporations are pass-through entities. This differs from a C-Corpoartion (which is the default form of corporation) which is taxed a corporate income tax at the end of the fiscal year in addition to the personal income taxes and dividend taxes that its owners and employees pay. Federal corporate income tax is about 15% to 35% of profits, and most states also have corporate income tax. This means after a C-Corporation has paid its expenses for the year, it will be taxed at least 15%-35% of whatever is left above the amount the company started with that year. If the company is an LLC or an S-Corporation, there is no corporate tax, and indeed the owners can even apply losses of the company against their personal income.

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Should my business be a Corporation or an LLC?

Insight Michael Moradzadeh Michael Moradzadeh · July 17, 2009

If your business only has a few investors and you do not anticipate receiving outside financing in the near future, an LLC is probably best for you because of its flexibility, simplicity, and pass-through taxation (see blog entry on pass-through taxation). However, if you want a board of directors that is distinct from the officers and/or shareholders of the company, or if you are looking for institutional investors, then a corporation is probably a better form of entity because of its more organized and established structure of governance.

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Why form a limited liability entity (Corporation or LLC)?

Insight Michael Moradzadeh Michael Moradzadeh · July 15, 2009

A limited liability entity (a corporation or an LLC) provides both financial and liability benefits. The financial benefits include the ability to deduct more business expenses from annual revenue when calculating taxable income than would be possible without an entity. Forming a limited liability entity also helps protect your personal assets in the event of a lawsuit or from debtors in a situation where your business’s liabilities exceed its assets. This means that as the owner of limited liability company, your personal assets will not be placed at risk because of the actions of your company, as long as the company is kept separate from your personal assets. This requires the corporation or LLC to: 1) make sure the company is adequately capitalized (it has the money necessary to cover the reasonably predictable legal and business responsibilities of the business); 2) that the company keeps clean accounting books and has accounts that are separate from the personal accounts of its owners or employees; and 3) that all legal documents are adequately maintained and the company complies with corporate governance laws.

Also, forming a corporation or llc usually makes it easier for a business to borrow money and to sell all or parts of the business in the future. It is important to note that the longer a business operates without a legal entity, the more complicated and expensive it becomes to transform it into one. For this reason it is very important to form a legal entity as soon as feasible.

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