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Entries tagged “Venture Capital & Angel Financing”

Rimon names Private Equity and Corporate Finance attorney Jennifer Dasari a Partner in firm’s Minneapolis office

News May 13, 2014
Represents entrepreneurs and companies in seeking private equity, venture and angel financing; also handles mergers & acquisitions Minneapolis (May 13, 2014) Increasing its strong team of corporate finance partners working to help start-ups and entrepreneurs gain financing for their growth, Rimon, P.C. has named Jennifer Dasari as a partner

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Venture Capital Survey of the Silicon Valley in 2009 Third Quarter

Insight Michael Moradzadeh Michael Moradzadeh · November 16, 2009

Dow Jones VentureSource is one of the most popular nationwide venture capital date reports in the United States. VentureSources published its latest data on the development of venture capital investments in the third quarter of 2009. Below are some overviews observed by VentureSource.

  • With 616 venture deals and $5.1 billion invested, Q3 is a 6% drop over Q2;
  • IT investment barely outpaces health care;
  • Web2.0 investments surpassed the software sector for first time on record;
  • Medical device investments nearly match biopharmaceuticals;
  • Corporations investing instead of acquiring, commitments to VC-backed firms surpasses 2008 total;
  • $5 million median deal size on par with Q1&Q2, but still lowest since 1999.

It is undeniable that the investments and fundraising by venture capitalists remained at low levels in 3Q’2009, but there is room for optimism as the economy is picking up slowly and Nasdaq continued to improve. In addition, with regard to the largest U.S. deals overall in 3Q’2009, eight deals are conducted in California, such as Facebook, Tesla Motors, and Pacific Biosciences of California, etc.

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What do entrepreneurs give up to VCs?

Insight September 01, 2009

Lots of young entrepreneurs in Silicon Valley these days hope to begin their business, let people know their companies, and furthermore, draw the attention of venture capitalists, who will devote money to their new enterprise.

Something that an entrepreneur must keep in mind is something that he must give up to VCs when getting money from them – most commonly stock of the new company. Generally, a venture capitalist asks for “preferred stock” from the entrepreneurs; the owner of preferred stock enjoys shareholder rights superior to the shareholders of common shares.

Most types of preferred stock are designed to convert into common stock (for example, one share of preferred stock converts into five shares of common stock), either at the discretion of the investors (voluntary conversion) or when some preset threshold is reached (automatic conversion, for example, in a public offering scenario). Thus, the conversion condition, time of conversion (voluntary or involuntary), and the conversion rate, is always one of the most fiercely argued clauses in the investment negotiations between VCs and entrepreneurs.

Of course, another major issue to consider before seeking venture capital is the loss of control of your company. When VCs invest, they want to make sure their investments are secure, so they often require a seat on the board of directors and certain voting rights. This means an entrepreneur effectively has a new boss. This can be a good thing since VCs often add experience and credibility to the company. However, this often causes power struggles between the entrepreneur and the venture capitalists.

 

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