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Entries tagged “Emerging Company”

Senior Global Transactional Attorney, Chris Terry, joins Rimon as a Partner in San Francisco Office

News July 02, 2015

Continuing to expand and strengthen its international corporate presence, Rimon Law has added Chris Terry, a corporate transactional attorney with almost two decades of experience serving as a trusted advisor to multinationals, start-ups and venture funds, as a Partner in the firm’s San Francisco office.

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Corporate Partner Timothy Gladden Joins Rimon’s New York Office

News February 11, 2014
New York, NY (February 11, 2014) Rimon, P.C. has added Timothy M. Gladden, a transactional attorney who has handled hundreds of deals for early stage and middle market companies, as a partner in its New York office. Mr. Gladden joins Rimon from Gladden Legal Group. Prior to that, he co-led the emerging companies practice at

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What is an S-Corporartion?

Insight Michael Moradzadeh Michael Moradzadeh · August 19, 2009

S-Corporations are corporations that elect to be treated as pass-through entities by the IRS. In order to qualify for S-Corporation status a corporation needs to satisfy several conditions, including the following: 1) all shareholders must be residents of the United States; 2) the corporation may only have one class of shareholders and may not have more than 75 shareholders; and 3) the company’s shareholders must be any of the following: individuals, estates, certain trusts, certain partnerships, tax-exempt charitable organizations, and other S corporations (but only if the other S corporation is the sole shareholder). This means S-Corporations may not be owned by other C-Corporations, LLCs, or foreign residents. If any of the requirements are not met at any time, the corporation automatically loses its S-Corporation status and will be treated as a a C-Corporation.

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Where should I form my entity?

Insight Michael Moradzadeh Michael Moradzadeh · August 19, 2009

This can be a very complex question. If you are looking to grow the company and get outside investment, then you should probably form an entity in Delaware. If your entity will have real estate holdings Nevada might also be a good option. Otherwise, it might make the most sense to simply form the entity in the state where you will be conducting most of your business.

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What is pass-through/flow-through taxation?

Insight Michael Moradzadeh Michael Moradzadeh · July 18, 2009

In a pass-through (or flow-through) entity, the entity’s income and expenses “pass through” the entity and are treated as the income and expenses of its owners. LLCs and S-Corporations are pass-through entities. This differs from a C-Corpoartion (which is the default form of corporation) which is taxed a corporate income tax at the end of the fiscal year in addition to the personal income taxes and dividend taxes that its owners and employees pay. Federal corporate income tax is about 15% to 35% of profits, and most states also have corporate income tax. This means after a C-Corporation has paid its expenses for the year, it will be taxed at least 15%-35% of whatever is left above the amount the company started with that year. If the company is an LLC or an S-Corporation, there is no corporate tax, and indeed the owners can even apply losses of the company against their personal income.

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